Press freedom violations recounted in real time (January -December 2017)

first_img Iran: Press freedom violations recounted in real time January 2020 Proposed Iranian law would ban US, British journalists and media News News December 21, 2017 – Updated on January 9, 2018 Press freedom violations recounted in real time (January -December 2017) Receive email alerts News Help by sharing this information June 11, 2021 Find out more IranMiddle East – North Africa Condemning abusesOnline freedoms WomenJudicial harassmentViolence Iran is stepping up pressure on journalists, including foreign journalists, in run-up to electioncenter_img News IranMiddle East – North Africa Condemning abusesOnline freedoms WomenJudicial harassmentViolence RSF_en to go further Follow the news on Iran June 9, 2021 Find out more 21.12.2017 – Two journalists released on bail after 100 days in solitaryReporters Without Borders (RSF) has learned that Sasan Aghai, the deputy editor of the newspaper Etemad, was freed yesterday and that Yaghma Fashkhami, a reporter for the news website Dideban e Iran, was freed today.Arrested at their respective workplaces in August by plainclothesmen from the justice department’s intelligence protection section, they were released on bail pending trial after more than 100 days of solitary confinement in Section 241 of Tehran’s Evin prison. Aghai was arrested on 11 August, Fashkhami on 21 August.———-04.12.2017- Website editor released on bailReporters Without Borders (RSF) has learned that Mohammad Hossien Hidari, the editor of the Dolat e Baharnewswebsite, was released on bail of 100 million toman (90,000 euros) on29 November pending trial.———-29.11.2017 – Pro-Ahmadinejad website editor detainedReporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns last week’s arrest of Mohammad Hossien Hidari, the editor of Dolat e Bahar, a news website that supports former President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s political faction. Arrested on 21 November after being summoned by the Tehran prosecutor’s office for culture and media, Hidari is accused inter alia of covering a speech by the controversial former president that was very critical of the judicial system.The Tehran prosecutor blocked Hidari’s proposed release on 100 million toman (90,000 euros) in bail. Access to the website has meanwhile been blocked since the start of November as a power struggle intensifies between the Ahmadinejad faction and those allied with Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei. Several former Ahmadinejad administration officials are currently the targets of judicial proceedings on corruption charges.———27.11.2017 – Ex-prosecutor jailed, but not for his crimes against journalistsFormer Tehran prosecutor Said Mortazavi has been given a two-year jail sentence but not in connection with his many crimes against journalists.Mortazavi has been jailed for complicity in the murder of Mohsen Roholamini, one of three people who died as a result of mistreatment in Kahrizak detention centre following their arrest on 12 June 2009 for their role in protests against then President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s disputed reelection. Roholamini was the son of a government dignitary. The other two were Amir Javadifar and Mohammad Kamarani. Acquitted at the original trial, Mortazavi was convicted when the case came before a Tehran appeal court.Reporters Without Borders (RSF) has been denouncing Mortazavi’s role in crimes against journalists and citizen-journalists for the past 17 years. He still needs to be tried for his involvement in the deaths of two journalists in Tehran’s Evin prison. One was Zahra Kazemi, a photographer with Iranian and Canadian dual citizenship who died in July 2003. The other was Omidreza Mirsayafi, a blogger who died in suspicious circumstances in March 2009.RSF believes that Mortazavi also shares responsibility for the arrests and convictions of hundreds of journalists and citizen-journalists, for the mistreatment and even torture they underwent while detained, and for the closure of around 100 newspapers while he was prosecutor.———02.11.207 – Editor freed on completing two-year jail termReporters Without Borders (RSF) has learned that Ehssan Mazndarani, the editor of the daily newspaper Farhikhteghan, was released on 31 October on completing a two-year jail sentence, during which he was hospitalized several times with heart and lung problems after going on hunger strike for more than three weeks. One of the victims of a wave of arrests in November 2015, he was originally given a seven- year jail sentence that was reduced to two years on appeal.RSF has also learned that Mokeryan news website journalist Bakhtyar Khoshnam was released yesterday on bail of 137 million toman (110,000 euros). He was arrested on 28 September.Read the 13.10.2017 report: Kurdish journalist returned to prison—————–19.10.2017 – Former editor banned from travelling abroadReporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns the international travel ban that has been imposed on Issa Saharkhiz, a journalist who used to edit several now-closed reformist newspapers. Officials stopped him on the tarmac of Tehran international airport as he was about to board a flight to Berlin on 17 October and confiscated his passport under article 16 of the passport law. Saharkhiz accuses the authorities of harassing him.Article 16 allows the judicial authorities to withdraw the passports of “persons whose travel would be contrary to the Islamic Republic’s interests.” One of the victims of a wave of arrests in November 2015, Saharkhiz had obtained a passport without any difficulty shortly after his release from prison in April of this year.RSF has also learned that Hamzeh Zargani, Saleh Torfi and Adel Sadoni, three citizen-journalists based in Ahvaz, the capital of the southwestern province of Khuzestan, have been released conditionally. Torfi and Sadoni were freed on completing half of their jail terms. Zargani had to pay bail of 50 million toman (40,000 euros) because he faces further prosecution in connection with his political activities. All three were arrested on 9 April 2013, incarcerated in the city’s Karon prison, and were given three-year jail terms on a charge of creating Facebook pages for the purpose of “anti-government propaganda.”———-18.10.2017 – Journalist convicted a second time for same “crime”Reporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns the one-year prison sentence that a Tehran revolutionary court passed on 30 September on Souroush Farhadian, a contributor to several pro-reform newspapers and editor of the bimonthly Ro Beh Ro (Opposite). His lawyer, Saleh Nikbakht, said it was the second time he has been tried and convicted for the same articles. He has appealed.Farhadian’s ordeal began on 15 May 2016, when he arrested in the central city of Arak on charges of anti-government publicity and “activities threatening national security” as a result of a complaint by the local military. After being freed on bail the next day, he was sentenced on 23 September 2016 to seven years in prison but an Arak appeal court later reduced the sentence to a fine.In both cases, he was convicted over the same articles denouncing the illegality of the detention of Mir Hossein Mousavi, a former prime minister and owner of the now closed newspaper Kalameh Sabaz, Zahra Rahnavard, a writer who is his wife, and Mehdi Karoubi, a former parliamentary speaker and owner of the now closed newspaper Etemad Melli.———-13.10.2017 – Kurdish journalist returned to prisonReporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns Mokeryan news website journalist Bakhtyar Khoshnam’s arrest on 28 September in Saghez (in Iran’s Kurdistan province) to serve a three months jail term for being in contact with media based abroad, above all Radio Farda (Radio Free Europe). He was taken directly to the city’s main prison to start serving the sentence. Initially arrested in June, he was freed on bail a month later. A Saghez revolutionary court imposed the sentence on 18 July after convicting him of “contact with media opposed to the Islamic Republic.”———-09.10.2017 – Prosecutors shut down reformist dailyReporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns the suspension of the reformist daily newspaper Mostaghel (Independent) by the Tehran prosecutor’s office for culture and media since 5 October. According to Mostaghel’s editor, Ali Nazari, it was suspended for publishing former Prime Minister Mir Hossein Mousavi’s photo. This apparently violated an order by the High Council for National Security and Justice banning any information in the media about the leaders of the protests against former President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s disputed reelection in June 2009.On 4 October, the newspaper published the photos of Iran’s five prime ministers from 1979 to 1989 (including Mousavi’s) to illustrate an article about the possibility of a return to a parliamentary system. The owner of the now closed newspaper Kalameh Sabaz, Mousavi was prime minister from 1981 to 1989 and ran against Ahmadinejad in the 2009 presidential election. He, his wife (the writer Zahra Rahnavard), and Mehdi Karoubi, a former parliamentary speaker and owner of the now closed newspaper Etemad Melli, have been kept illegally under house arrest and deprived of all their rights since 24 February 2011.———-03.10.2017 – Mehdi Khazali freedReporters Without Borders (RSF) has learned that Mehdi Khazali, an outspoken blogger who was arrested on a Tehran street by plainclothesmen on 12 August, was freed on 28 September. The editor of the Baran blog, he had been openly critical of the head of the judicial authority in the months prior to his arrest. Arrested many times in the past, he was sentenced to 14 years in prison in 2011. The conditions of his latest release have not been revealed. He is the son of Ayatollah Abolghasem Khazali, an influential conservative cleric and regime member for 37 years.———-14.09.2017 – Detention of two journalists extended by another monthReporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns a judicial decision to extend the provisional detention of two journalists – Sasan Aghai, the deputy editor of the newspaper Etemad and Yaghma Fashkhami, a reporter for the news website Dideban e Iran – by another month in violation of both Iranian law and international standards. They are also being denied the right to see a lawyer and to be visited by their families.Both were arrested last month at their workplace by plainclothesmen from the justice department’s intelligence protection section – Aghai on 11 August and Fashkhami on 21 August. The authorities have still not said why they were arrested or where they are being held.———-11.09.2017 – Kurdish journalist freed on completing jail termReporters Without Borders (RSF) is pleased to learn that Khosro Kurdpour, a Kurdish journalist who edited the Mokeryan news website in the northwestern city of Mahabad, was released on 8 September on completing a sentence of five-year in prison. Ministry of intelligence officials arrested him at his home in Mahabad on 7 March 2013, one day before summoning and then arresting his brother, Masoud Kurdpour, who contributed to the website. The Mahabad revolutionary court that sentenced them both on 9 November 2013 gave Masoud Kurdpour a three and a half years jail term.———-30.08.2017 – Two women journalists freed provisionallyReporters Without Borders (RSF) is relieved to learn that Hengameh Shahidi, a woman journalist who edited the Paineveste blog, and Zeniab Karimian, a woman journalist who hosted a programme on Iran’s 3rd TV channel, were both released provisionally yesterday on bail of 900 million toman (810,000 euros).Arrested on 9 March, Shahidi staged several hunger strikes in protest against her detention and prison conditions, despite being very ill. Karimian was arrested at her home on 23 January 2017 by intelligence ministry plainclothesmen.Both were held in isolation in different security sections of Tehran’s Evin prison, initially under the intelligence ministry’s control and then under the control of the justice department’s intelligence section. When Shahidi emerged from the prison, she appeared weak and had clearly lost a lot of weight.———-07.08.2017 – Imprisoned citizen-journalist’s wife arrestedReporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns the arrest of Nastaran Naimi, the wife of the imprisoned citizen-journalist Soheil Arabi. Plainclothesmen arrested her at her home on 31 July after searching it. Her family has still not been told why she was arrested or where she is being held.Arabi has been detained for the past three and a half years. Arrested by Revolutionary Guards in December 2013, he was incarcerated in Security Section 2a of Tehran’s Evin prison, where he was isolated and mistreated for two months to get him to confess to helping to create a Facebook network that blasphemed Islam and criticized the government.The confession led to the imposition of a death sentence in August 2014, which ­– following protests by his lawyer and the intercession of UN special rapporteurs – was eventually overturned. At a retrial in September 2015, he was sentenced to seven and a half years in prison starting with two years under observation, during which time he must prove he has repented to avoid reimposition of the death sentence.———-02.08.2017 – A journalist and four Telegram group administrators bailedReporters Without Borders (RSF) has learned that four administrators of a group that used the instant messaging service Telegram to circulate information – Seid Mojtaba Bagheri, Said Naghdi, Javad Jamshidi and Nima Keshvari – were freed on bail of 500 million toman (410,000 euros) on 30 and 31 July.Held in Tehran’s Evin prison after their arrest by Revolutionary Guards on 16 March, they are due to be tried on 12 August. Two other members of the group who were arrested at the same time, Sobhan Jafari Tash and Ali Ahmadinia, will be freed as soon as their bail is paid, their lawyer, Ali Mojtahad Zadeh, said.RSF has also learned that the journalist and photographer Assal Esmaeilzadeh was freed on bail of 300 million toman (270,000 euros) on 13 July pending trial. She was arrested without charge at the behest of the Tehran prosecutor’s office for culture and media on 20 June.———-30.06.2017 – Two months after release, journalist sentenced againReporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns the six-month jail sentence that was imposed on Issa Saharkhiz, the former editor of several, now-closed reformist newspapers, on 19 June, just two months after his release. His lawyer, Mahmoud Alizadeh-Tabatabaie, said he was convicted of insulting the head of the judicial system.One of the victims of a wave of arrests in early November 2015, Saharkhiz was sentenced by a Tehran revolutionary court in August 2016 to three years in prison on charges of anti-government propaganda and insulting Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei. His lawyer reported at the time that two other charges against Saharkhiz – publishing false news and insulting the head of the judicial system – would be tried separately as political crimes before a court of assizes.After the latest sentence was passed on 19 June, Alizadeh-Tabatabaie pointed out that the court had accepted that his client’s criticism of the head of the judicial system had been personal in nature. It therefore could not be regarded as a political crime meriting a six-month jail sentence, he added, announcing that they planned to appeal.Saharkhiz was released on 15 April after being deemed to have completed the first sentence. While held, he staged several hunger strikes in protest against his imprisonment and had been serving his sentence in a Tehran hospital since March 2016.———-26.06.2017 – Newspaper journalist freed provisionallyReporters Without Borders (RSF) has learned that, after payment of 300 million toman (270,000 euros) in bail, Borna News social affairs editor Tahereh Riahai was released provisionally on 24 June pending trial. Arrested by plainclothes intelligence officers on 27 December 2016, she had been kept in isolation in Section 209 of Tehran’s Evin prison for months.———-23.06.2017 – Ahmadinejad’s former press adviser arrestedReporters Without Borders (RSF) has learned that Abdol Reza Davari, former President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s onetime press adviser, who also once ran the newspaper Shahrvand and the government news agency Irna, was arrested on 31 May in order to serve a three-year jail sentence.Davari was convicted in September 2013 of “insulting” Supreme Leader AliKhamenei in three comments posted on Facebook and was given a six-year jail sentence that was reduced to three years on appeal. He was arrested two days after posting an open letter criticizing Ebrahim Raisi and Mostafa Pour Mohammadi, two members of a commission that passed death sentences in 1988 on thousands of political prisoners who refused to renounce their beliefs.———-01.06.2017 – Narges Mohammadi back in prison two days after operationReporters Without Borders (RSF) is very concerned about the health of Narges Mohammadi, an imprisoned journalist and human rights defender who has been returned to prison just two days after undergoing an operation. Rushed to hospital with severe uterine bleeding on 28 May, Mohammadi was operated on the next day and was taken back to prison yesterday.Held since May 2015, Mohammadi was deemed to have completed an initial six-year sentence on 17 March and immediately began a second, ten-year one. She has several ailments including muscular paralysis but is being denied the medical care she needs. Her health is in danger and she should not be in prison. We call for her immediate release.———-24.05.2017 – Magazine editor Morad Saghafi released on bailReporters Without Borders (RSF) has learned that Morad Saghafi, the editor of the magazine Goft o Gu (Dialogue in Persian), was released on payment of bail on 20 May pending trial. He had been arrested at his Tehran home on 16 March.———-18.05.2017 – Hengameh Shahidi suspends hunger strikeReporters Without Borders (RSF) was relieved to learn today that imprisonedjournalist Hengameh Shahidi decided to suspend her hunger strike after receiving a visit from her family in 16 May and a promise from the Tehran prosecutor’s office that her appalling prison conditions will be improved and that she will be given complete medical examinations. According to her family, she is suffering from several heart and respiratory ailments, along with other conditions. She had not been eating any food since 10 May.———12.05.2017 – Journalist freed after ten years in prisonReporters Without Borders (RSF) is pleased to learn that Mohammad Sedegh Kabodvand, the editor of Payam-e mardom-e Kurdestan (a regional newspaper closed by the authorities in 2004), was granted a conditional release today on completing ten years in prison.Held since July 2007 in Tehran’s Evin prison, Kabodvand was sentenced to a total of 11 years in prison in connection with his journalistic activities and his creation of a human rights organization in Iranian Kurdistan, the northern region where he lived.He has been freed provisionally pending a judicial decision on the application of article 134 for the new Islamic criminal code to the rest of his sentence. Under a 2013 amendment to the code, a person convicted on several charges should serve only the most important sentence. By this token, he should have been freed four years ago.——–27.04.2017 – Two journalists freed conditionallyReporters Without Borders (RSF) has learned that two imprisoned journalists, Kaivan Karimi and Issa Saharkhiz, have been released conditionally in the past week.Karimi, a young documentary filmmaker, was freed on 20 April after completing half of the one-year sentence he received in November 2016 . Saharkhiz, the editor of several reformist newspapers was released on 25 April. His lawyer, Mahmoud Alizadeh-Tabatabaie, said he had completed his sentence.One of the victims of a wave of arrests in early November 2015, Saharkhiz was sentenced by a Tehran revolutionary court in August 2016 to three years in prison on charges of anti-government propaganda and insulting Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei. While held, he staged several hunger strikes in protest against his imprisonment and had been hospitalized since March 2016. The sentence was reduced last September.Ranked 165th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2017 World Press Freedom Index, Iran is one of the world’s five biggest prisons for media personnel, with a total of 28 journalists and citizen journalists detained.———-19.04.2017 – Narges Mohammadi begins serving second jail termReporters Without Borders (RSF) is outraged by the continuing persecution of journalist and leading human rights defender Narges Mohammadi, who has just started serving a ten-year prison sentence on completing a six-year one. She received the ten-year sentence a year after her most recent arrest, on 5 May 2015.Mohammadi has a long history of persecution by the judicial authorities and has been arrested several times. During her spells out of prison, she has worked closely with Nobel peace laureate Shirin Ebadi at the Centre for Human Rights Defenders.The six-year sentence followed her arrest at her home on the evening of 10 June 2010. She was convicted two months later on charges of “meeting and plotting against the Islamic Republic,” “anti-government publicity:” and “collaborating with the Centre for Human Rights Defenders” and was given an 11-year jail term that was reduced to six years on appeal in March 2011.Mohammadi suffered muscular paralysis as a consequence of the heavy-handed interrogation sessions to which she was subjected after her arrest in 2010. As a result, she was paroled in July 2012.———-17.03.2017 – More journalists arrestedReporters Without Borders (RSF) yet again condemns the persecution of journalists in Iran after at least three more were arrested in the past week.The latest victims include Morad Saghafi, the editor of the magazine Goft o Gu (“Dialogue” in Persian), who was arrested at his Tehran home yesterday and was taken to an unknown location. His lawyer, Hamed Zargar, said neither he nor Saghafi’s family have been told why he was arrested.Meanwhile, Ali Motahari, the deputy speaker of Iran’s parliament, yesterday asked the minister of intelligence to explain why a military unit recently arrested 12 editors of pro-reform information pages on the instant messaging service Telegram.Motahari also criticized the detention of Ehssan Mazandarani, the former editor of the newspaper Farhikhteghan, on 12 March (see RSF’s 13 March release). His wife, Malieh Hossieni, a journalist with the newspaper Farhikhteghana, was fired the day after his arrest.Although banned, apps and social networks such as Telegram, Facebook and Twitter nowadays play an important role in providing Iranians with news and information. Telegram says it has more than 15 million users in Iran.According to the Kalameh news website, Ali Ahmadinia, the administrator of the Eslahat News (Reform News) channel on Telegram, was arrested on 14 March and was taken to an unknown location.RSF is currently very concerned about the health of two journalists who have been on hunger strike since their arrest. One is Mazandarani, who was arrested on 12 March (see above). The other Henghameh Shahidi, who was arrested on 9 March.———-15.03.2017 – Former editor gets six-month jail termReporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns the six-month prison sentence that has been passed on Hossein Karoubi, the former editor of Etemad Meli (a newspaper closed since August 2009) for circulating the open letter that his father, Mehdi Karoubi, wrote to President Hassan Rohani.In the April 2016 letter, published in mostly foreign-based media outlets and on social networks, Mehdi Karoubi asks to be tried before a public court “in order to present the evidence I possess about massive fraud during the 2005 and 2009 presidential elections and to show what has happened to young Iranians in the country’s legal and illegal detention centres.”Etemad Melli’s owner and a former parliamentary speaker, Mehdi Karoubi has been under house arrest since February 2011, a fate he has shared with former Prime Minister Mir Hossein Mousavi (the owner of the closed newspaper Kalameh Sabaz) and Mousavi’s wife, the writer Zahra Rahnavard. Mousavi and Mehdi Karoubi, who are both former presidential candidates, are being held illegally and are being denied their rights. Their state of health is very worrying.RSF has meanwhile learned that Samna Safari, a journalist with the monthly Andisher Poya, was released on 11 March after the authorities determined that he had served his two-year jail sentence. Detained along with three other journalists in a wave of arrests in November 2015, he was sentenced by a revolutionary court in March 2016 to five years in prison for “anti-government propaganda activities.” This was reduced to two years on appeal.———-28.02.2017 – City of Qom suspends newspaperReporters Without Borders (RSF) condemns the decision by the city of Qom’s public prosecutor to suspend the newspaper Shakheh Sabz on 26 February, a day after it ran a story criticizing the level of violence in one of its poorest districts, which it likened to a “jungle.” The suspension was ordered after 136 parliamentarians supported a resolution accusing the daily of “insulting the population of the Holy City of Qom.” The newspaper’s name means “Green Branch.”———-22.02.2017 – Ahmad Montazeri returned to prisonReporters Without Borders (RSF) firmly condemns progressive cleric Ahmad Montazeri’s arrest yesterday. The editor of the website of his late father, Ayatollah Hossein Ali Montazeri, he was returned to prison after being summoned before a special court for clerics.Tried behind closed doors and without a defence lawyer on 20 October, Montazeri was sentenced on 27 November to ten years in prison for endangering state security, ten years for publishing a “classified audio recording” and another year for anti-government “propaganda.”He was prosecuted for posting an old recording on the website on 9 August 2016 in which his father could be heard criticizing the wave of executions of political prisoners in the 1980s.For more information: Ahmad Montazeri gets 21-year jail term as part of bid to suppress history———-17.02.2017 – Editor freed on completing jail termReporters Without Borders (RSF) has learned that Ehssan Mazndarani – the editor of the newspaper Farhikhteghan and one of the victims of a wave of arrests in November 2015 – was released on 9 February. He had been given a seven-year jail sentence that was reduced to two years on appeal, His lawyer said he was freed as a result of a decision that he had completed his sentence. While in prison, he was hospitalized several times with heart and chest problems after a three-week hunger strike.———-10.01.2017 – Website reporter flogged for getting facts wrongReporters Without Borders (RSF) is appalled to learn that Hossien Movahedi, a local news website reporter, was flogged last week in Najafabad, a city 450 km south of Tehran, for getting one of his facts wrong in a story about the confiscation of mopeds from female students at a technological secondary school in the city.Movahedi reported on the Najafabad News website on 14 June 2016 that the police seized 35 mopeds when, according to the police, it was only eight. Although he apologized for his mistake and although the police were allowed to publish their version on the website, the police pressed charges against him and a Najafabad court sentenced him to 40 lashes for “publishing false information.” This inhuman and medieval sentence was carried out on 4 January.Iran has yet to ratify the Convention against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment.———-06.01.2016 – Woman journalist freed on completing one-year jail termReporters Without Borders (RSF) has learned that Rihaneh Tabatabai, a journalist who has worked for several reformist newspapers, was released yesterday on completing a one-year jail term on charges of endangering national security and anti-government publicity. She was arrested on 12 January 2016 to begin serving the sentence, which was originally imposed in November 2014 and was confirmed by a Tehran appeal court a year later. The sentence also includes two-year ban on political and journalistic activity in the media and online following her release. In all, Tabatabai has been jailed four times since 2010 in connection with her journalistic activities.———-Press freedom violations recounted in real time (January -December 2016)——————– Press freedom violations recounted in real time (January -December 2015)——————-Press freedom violations recounted in real time ( January-December 2014)———————-Press freedom violations recounted in real time ( January-December 2013)—————-Press freedom violations recounted in real time (January-December 2012)———-Press freedom violations recounted in real time (January-December 2011)—–Press freedom violations recounted in real time (July-December 2010) ——–Press freedom violations recounted in real time (January-July 2010)———Press freedom violations recounted in real time (June-December 2009) Organisation May 10, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Reporters Without Borders concerned about dismissal of prosecutor in Gongadze case

first_img February 26, 2021 Find out more UkraineEurope – Central Asia October 31, 2003 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Reporters Without Borders concerned about dismissal of prosecutor in Gongadze case News Receive email alerts News RSF_en UkraineEurope – Central Asia Help by sharing this information Reporters Without Borders expressed concern today about the sacking of Ukrainian prosecutor-general Svyatoslav Piskun and whether it was linked to the probe into the murder of journalist Georgy Gongadze. His dismissal coincided with the arrest on 24 October of a former interior ministry official and came in the wake of numerous errors and failures that have dogged the murder enquiry for more than three years. Reporters Without Borders expressed concern today about the sacking of Ukrainian prosecutor-general Svyatoslav Piskun and whether it was linked to the probe into the murder of journalist Georgy Gongadze. His dismissal coincided with the arrest on 24 October of a former interior ministry official and came in the wake of numerous errors and failures that have dogged the murder enquiry for more than three years. “We ask you to assure us that Piskun’s departure is not related to the Gongadze case and to keep us informed of all developments in the investigation, especially the consequences of the arrest of former interior ministry secret police chief Oleksy Pukach,” said Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Robert Ménard in a letter to Ukrainian President Leonid Kuchma.”We also ask you to let us know as quickly as possible who will now be in charge of the Gongadze case. The lack of results in the enquiry is very worrying to us and this new turn of events can only delay further the quest for the truth,” he said. The press freedom organisation also wrote to Piskun asking that if he thought his dismissal was linked, even partly, to the Gongadze case, that he should make public the evidence he had managed to collect so far that might help solve the case. Piskun was sacked by President Kuchma on 29 October, officially at the request of a government anti-corruption commission, for alleged abuse of authority and serious legal offences. He had been in charge of the Gongadze case since his appointment in July last year to succeed Mikhailo Potebenko, who was also sacked. Gongadze vanished on 16 September 2000 and his headless and mutilated body was found on 2 November that year. A Reporters Without Borders fact-finding mission in January 2001 noted many very serious errors in the investigation. Potebenko, elected prosecutor-general by parliament in March 2001, tried to protect government officials from accusations of involvement in the killing. Gongadze’s widow Myroslava and his mother Lessia were systematically excluded from the investigation and were not allowed to be civil parties in the case until late January 2001. Myroslava Gongadze filed a complaint against the Ukrainian government before the European Court of Human Rights on 16 September 2002. to go further Organisation News March 26, 2021 Find out more Crimean journalist “confesses” to spying for Ukraine on Russian TV Follow the news on Ukraine Ukrainian media group harassed by broadcasting authority News Ukraine escalates “information war” by banning three pro-Kremlin media September 7, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

Government must engage Limerick people on Climate Action

first_imgWhatsApp Denise Charlton, CEO of The Community Foundation for IrelandGOVERNMENT is being asked to invest €1 per person per year to ensure communities in Limerick are fully engaged on the issue of climate action.The call is being made in a submission by The Community Foundation for Ireland which warns that the national €500m Climate Action Plan will not succeed unless there is better engagement, awareness and education with people in Limerick and across the country.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The Foundation says Limerick risks being impacted by severe weather events unless policymakers begin the process of listening to the concerns, the ideas and the initiatives of communities. It is proposing an annual investment by Government of €5m a year over the next three years.Part of the funding would see the development of community energy projects, sustainable shopping and nature projects in Limerick.The Community Foundation for Ireland has translated almost €60m in gifts, donations and legacies into grants for local areas over the past 20-yearsThe submission to Ministers seeks two actions:Establish a Climate Friendly Communities Fund  (€3.75 million per annum)Thriving communities rely not only on people but also on a number of aspects such as a healthy biosphere, sustainable/circular economies as well as innovative community initiatives that support more vulnerable members.The Climate Friendly Communities Fund, managed by The Community Foundation for Ireland, would encourage and support the development of solutions to social to issues that arise in communities across Ireland during the period of transition to a resource efficient economy and society.Types of projects which could be developed include community energy projects, sustainable shopping as well as the development of pollination corridors.Establish a Climate Justice Fund(€1.25 million per annum)This fund would be used to foster local dialogue, increase awareness and support key activities that will promote a just transition.Based on the Mary Robinson Foundation’s definition of Climate justice, which links human rights and development to achieve a human-centred approach, safeguarding the rights of the most vulnerable people and sharing the burdens and benefits of climate change and its impacts equitably and fairly.The Climate Justice Fund would encourage and support the development of new solutions to local social issues that arise during the period of transition to a resource efficient economy and society.Climate Justice projects are being seen as crucial to ensuring a just transition, with states such as Scotland establishing a specific Climate Justice Fund to support such work.Publishing the submission Denise Charlton, CEO of The Community Foundation for Ireland, said:“Again this summer we are seeing the impact of Global climate change on Limerick’s communities. A season which started with the threat of drought is ending with high winds, torrential rains and August storms with flooding and extensive structural damage.The debate about whether action is needed is over. Now we must work to try and ensure that the plans in place to help our communities, counties and our country become successfully sustainable are delivered.Ensuring community education, awareness and support is key to achieving this. For a relatively small investment this localised engagement could create a wider understanding of why the radical changes being proposed by Government are needed.At The Community Foundation for Ireland we know the impacts local initiatives can have. We know how mobilising a community can make all the difference. For our part we are willing to offer the Government our expertise in knowledge on how this can be achieved.” RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Email WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Linkedin Twitter Printcenter_img Previous articleTempleglantine NS approved funding for essential worksNext article#GolfGate Phil Hogan visited Limerick recently Meghann Scully Advertisement Facebook LimerickNewsGovernment must engage Limerick people on Climate ActionBy Meghann Scully – August 25, 2020 74 Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival TAGSClimate changeKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick Post Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League openerlast_img read more

Ellington takes over at middle schoolEducator replaces longtime principal

first_img By Digital AIM Web Support – February 24, 2021 Ellington takes over at middle schoolEducator replaces longtime principal Previous articleMuralistNext article062919 Cepero Meet 01 Digital AIM Web Support Facebook Twitter Pinterest TAGS  Twittercenter_img Local News Facebook Brian Ellington will be the new principal at Bowie Middle School. Although he planned to pursue a law degree in college, newly installed Bowie Middle School Principal Brian Ellington found his niche in coaching and teaching. A native of Hilliard, Ohio, Ellington moved with his family as his father’s postings as a Nazarene minister changed. Ellington mostly grew up in New Mexico, but made his way to West Texas about 19 years ago. His parents moved to Hobbs, N.M., when he was a seventh grader. They lived in Farmington for a few years. But he has been in the West Texas area since 2000. Ellington attended University of New Mexico and then transferred his junior year to Eastern New Mexico University in Portales. He earned a bachelor’s degree with an emphasis in social studies and is certified in kindergarten through 12th grade social studies. Ellington later earned a master’s in educational administration from University of Texas Permian Basin in 2015. He began coaching basketball for his brother’s teams and found he enjoyed it. Ellington had some of the best teachers in the late legendary Hobbs basketball coach Ralph Tasker, Jack Stephenson at Midland High School and Russ Gilmore in Hobbs. Ellington stands 6-foot-8 inches tall. “About the time I was finished with my bachelor’s, I decided I was going to coach and I was going to teach history. I just loved history and social studies. When I was just about to graduate in spring of ‘95, I was at one of my brother’s basketball games. He was a senior,” Ellington recalled. He talked to Tasker, who had coached Ellington as a sophomore in Hobbs. Ellington updated the coach on what he was up to and Tasker said he should put in an application for a coaching position. Tasker hired him as a freshman basketball coach. “That’s how I got my start — coaching freshman basketball and teaching history at Highland Junior High in Hobbs. I was intending to go the elementary route, but basketball led me another way,” Ellington said. He said Tasker had great relationships with students and taught him how to go the extra mile for students, care for students and how they develop. Tasker racked up 11 state championships and more than 1,100 wins in his 50-year career. “I had the opportunity to also coach for Jack Stephenson at Midland High School. He won a state championship in Texas. Very similar to Coach Tasker, in fact. Very kid oriented and would do anything within his power to help kids be successful. I was the JV coach and varsity assistant there. I also coached as an assistant for Russ Gilmore at Hobbs, who won five state championships … I think he’s pushing 1,000 wins now,” Ellington said. Ellington was head basketball coach in Big Spring for two years from 2000 to 2002. This will be Ellington’s 25th year in education. After a long stint of teaching and coaching, he decided he wanted to give back not only to help teachers become successful but to help students reach their goals. The last four years, he has been at the middle or junior high school level. He was an assistant principal at Nimitz Middle School from 2015-2016 and most recently at Abell Junior High in Midland. He replaces Shelia Stevenson, who is retiring as principal of Bowie. She served nearly 35 years with the district. “ECISD was the first district that gave me the opportunity to be an administrator and assistant principal. Robin Fawcett (director of human resources for secondary personnel) hired me there. I heard of this opportunity. I loved the time that I spent in ECISD. (There are) very, very hard working teachers. … I knew of Bowie. I knew of Ms. Stevenson. I thought this would be a great opportunity to come back to Odessa,” Ellington said. His wife, Rhonda, also was in Odessa previously as a campus curriculum facilitator, now termed an instructional coach. She will be stationed at Burnet Elementary School. Together, they have four children. Ellington said he likes middle school because the students are in their formative years. “They’re definitely in transition. They’re making that transition from elementary school to middle school, so they’re in a maturation process. I believe my experiences as an educator, as a coach and my life experiences enable me to not only help these students be successful academically, but also successful emotionally and socially and hopefully prepare them for the real world,” he said. His goal for Bowie is constant improvement. Ellington expects the campus to have a little more than 1,200 students next year and more than 100 employees. Ellington said some advice Coach Tasker gave him helped him develop as a player and individual. “… People improve at different rates. The guy that works harder is going to progress. He’s going to get better and maybe pass up that guy that was better than him. In junior high, I was able to do that and ended up playing varsity basketball at Farmington, N.M., my senior year …,” Ellington said. “It’s kind of stuck with me ever since that if I work hard I’m going to eventually progress and be successful. It doesn’t matter where you start … it’s where you end up each day and where you end up in the end is the important thing,” he added. Roberto Cedillo, an executive director of secondary education, said he’s thrilled to have Ellington as the new Bowie principal. “He brings a wealth of teaching, coaching and administrative experience. He has worked and learned from very successful principals and coaches. I believe he can use this knowledge and experience to take Bowie to the next level,” Cedillo said in an email. WhatsApp WhatsApp Pinterestlast_img read more

Log In Virtually For the LL100 Servicer Summit

first_imgSocial distancing can’t separate professionals from connecting, as the mortgage servicing industry will come together on May 14 for the Legal League 100’s Virtual Servicer Summit. Industry leaders will converge digitally to unpack the latest critical regulatory changes, COVID-19 updates, and proactive strategies “If we are learning anything during these new working conditions, fluidity and flexibility are important,” said Roy Diaz, Managing Shareholder for Diaz Anselmo Lindberg, P.A, and Chair of the Legal League 100. “The [Legal League] 100 Virtual Summit fits perfectly into the ‘new normal’ and will be a terrific opportunity to deliver meaningful information while we shelter-in-place.” Among the panelists participating include, Christopher L. Carman, Litigation and Compliance Counsel, BSI Financial Services; Candace Russell, VP Post-Sale, Carrington Mortgage; Ryan Bourgeois, General Counsel—Partner, BDF Law Group; and John A. Dunnery, VP, Government Loan Servicing, Bayview Loan Servicing, LLC. Also, William R. Emmons, Lead Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, will provide the afternoon keynote. “Now more than ever it is vital that leaders within the mortgage servicing industry come together to not only discuss the challenges, but more importantly, solutions during these trying times,” said Lindsay Wolf, Director of Membership Operations for Five Star Global. Some of the topics to be discussed include eNotes and eMortgages, regulatory changes within the industry, and how COVID-19 has impacted businesses across the nation.  Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, News Mike Albanese is a reporter for DS News and MReport. He is a University of Alabama graduate with a degree in journalism and a minor in communications. He has worked for publications—both print and online—covering numerous beats. A Connecticut native, Albanese currently resides in Lewisville. The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago April 28, 2020 753 Views Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Share Save Previous: Wells Fargo Names New Head of Operations Next: Bracing for Household Debt Spikes Log In Virtually For the LL100 Servicer Summit Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Subscribe Related Articles Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago  Print This Post Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Home / Daily Dose / Log In Virtually For the LL100 Servicer Summit 2020-04-28 Mike Albanese Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago About Author: Mike Albanese The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days agolast_img read more

Don’t Use Saliva To Affix Court Fee Stamps : Delhi District &Sessions Judge (HQ)

first_imgNews UpdatesDon’t Use Saliva To Affix Court Fee Stamps : Delhi District &Sessions Judge (HQ) LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK18 May 2020 7:45 PMShare This – xTo contain the further spread of the COVID19 infection, the Office of the District & Sessions Judge (HQs) has issued a direction to not to use saliva while affixing the court fees stamps on petitions or applications.The said direction has been issued in view of the ongoing COVID19 pandemic and to reduce the spread of the virus in district courts. The…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginTo contain the further spread of the COVID19 infection, the Office of the District & Sessions Judge (HQs) has issued a direction to not to use saliva while affixing the court fees stamps on petitions or applications.The said direction has been issued in view of the ongoing COVID19 pandemic and to reduce the spread of the virus in district courts. The Circular states:’Lawyers/Munshis/Litigants/Naib/Courts/Police Officials may be asked through court staff to not to use saliva while affixing court fee stamps on the application/petition and envelopes containing summons/notices, etc.’In addition to this, the officials are also directed to not to use saliva while doing pagination of files. While asking for strict compliance with the aforesaid directions, the Circular states that the court staff shall advise the lawyers to use plastic sponge damper pad while inspecting the judicial files.Click here to download OrderNext Storylast_img read more

Delhi HC Rejects Tenant’s Claim For Suspension of Rent Due To Lockdown, Allows Postponement Of Payment Schedule [Read Order]

first_imgNews UpdatesDelhi HC Rejects Tenant’s Claim For Suspension of Rent Due To Lockdown, Allows Postponement Of Payment Schedule [Read Order] Karan Tripathi21 May 2020 11:03 PMShare This – xDelhi High Court has held that tenants cannot invoke Force Majeure and claim suspension of rent owing to the lockdown, when they continue to occupy the rented premises. However providing some relief to the tenants, the Single Bench of Justice Prathiba M Singh noted that some postponement or relaxation in the schedule of payment of rent can be granted owing to…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginDelhi High Court has held that tenants cannot invoke Force Majeure and claim suspension of rent owing to the lockdown, when they continue to occupy the rented premises. However providing some relief to the tenants, the Single Bench of Justice Prathiba M Singh noted that some postponement or relaxation in the schedule of payment of rent can be granted owing to the lockdown. The order has come in an application which raises various issues relating to suspension of payment of rent by tenants owing to the COVID-19 lockdown crisis and the legal questions surrounding the same. The application sought a suspension of the direction passed by the HC in 2017 to pay rent at the rate of Rs 3.5 lakhs per month for a property in Khan Market, New Delhi as a condition for staying the eviction order passed by the Rent Controller Court. The applicant sought suspension of rent citing the COVID-19 lockdown. Before moving on to the merits of the application, the court made the following preliminary observation: ‘The question as to whether the lockdown would entitle tenants to claim waiver or exemption from payment of rent or suspension of rent, is bound to arise in thousands of cases across the country. Though there can be no standard rule that can be prescribed to address these cases, some broad parameters can be kept under consideration, in order to determine the manner in which the issues that arise can be resolved.’ The counsel for the tenant had sought waiver of rent, or some partial relief such as postponement of payment, on the ground that the lockdown has caused serious damages to the business. On the other hand, the landlord’s counsel argued that mere disruption of the business cannot exempt the Tenants from making the monthly payments as the Landlord also depends on the income from the tenanted premises.Doctrine Of Frustration Under Section 56 Of Contract Act Not Applicable To Lease Agreements : Delhi HC [Read Judgment] After taking these submissions into consideration, the court analysed sections 32 and 56 of the Indian Contract Act to note that section 56, which talks about frustration of the contract caused by an impossibility to perform the duty, would not apply to a lease agreement and other similarly situated contracts which are `executed contracts’ and not `executory contracts’ The court observed: “The fundamental principle would be that if the contract contains a clause providing for some sort of waiver or suspension of rent, only then the tenant could claim the same. The force majeure clause in the contract could also be a contingency under Section 32 which may allow the tenant to claim that the contract has become void and surrender the premises. However, if the tenant wishes to retain the premises and there is no clause giving any respite to the tenant, the rent or the monthly charges would be payable.” After this, the court looked into the issue of doctrine of force majeure. The court looked into section 108(B)(e) of the Transfer of Property Act to observe that the said provision would apply only in the absence of a contractual stipulation. The court noted: ‘In view of the above settled legal position, temporary non-use of premises due to the lockdown which was announced due to the COVID-19 outbreak cannot be construed as rendering the lease void under Section 108(B)(e) of the TPA.’Click Here To Download Order[Read Order] Next Storylast_img

Hurricane Michael shuts down 40 percent of Gulf oil production. What will it do to gas prices?

first_imgMark Wallheiser/Getty Images(PANAMA CITY, Fla.) — Hurricane Michael may be a monster of a storm, but it’s unlikely to cause dramatic gasoline price spikes, energy experts said.Energy companies were evacuating platforms and rigs, and reducing operations for 42.3 percent of current oil production and 31.7 percent of natural gas production, as reported to the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement by midday Wednesday.Michael is the worst hurricane in over a century to hit the Florida Panhandle. About 375,000 people were under mandatory or voluntary evacuation orders across parts of 18 Florida counties, according to The Associated Press. While it’s life-threatening for residents, the Gulf Coast’s refineries — which turn crude oil into gasoline, heating oil and jet fuel — were mostly out of the storm’s path.“The storm’s path appears to be taking it well east of most of the GoM [Gulf of Mexico] production, so we expect a relatively quick return post-storm, though we will have to wait for word on damage,” Paul Sankey, an analyst at Mizuho Securities, wrote in a research note to clients Wednesday morning.Despite dramatic storm images and precautionary measures, there were healthy supplies of oil inventories in the U.S. Gulf Coast prior to the storm. In recent years, fracking has chipped away at the Gulf Coast’s dominance in U.S. oil production.“There is plenty of crude oil around, so the Gulf of Mexico platform shutdowns won’t do much,” David Hackett, co-founder of energy consulting firm Stillwater Associates, told ABC News. There’s no threat to gasoline output since most facilities in the Gulf Coast’s refinery row are still up and running, he added.“Chevron Pascagoula, the easternmost of the Gulf Coast refineries, shut down but the rest of the refining fleet is running,” Hackett said. “The hurricane shouldn’t have a big impact on the pipelines that carry gasoline from Houston to New York. Some stations may have run-outs as consumers fill up, but I don’t expect widespread fuel outages.”A Chevron Pascagoula Refinery spokeswoman told ABC News, “While we cannot speculate on any possible impact to operations, we are following our hurricane procedures and are paying close attention to the track and forecast of Hurricane Michael.”On Wednesday, the national average price of gasoline was $2.91 per gallon, according to AAA. A year ago it was $2.49.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Zenith Energy makes payment to KUFPEC for Sidi El Kilani

first_imgZenith can confirm that it has initiated the necessary formalities in relation to the aforementioned approval process, and that a decision is expected in due course Zenith Energy makes payment to KUFPEC for Sidi El Kilani. (Credit: drpepperscott230 from Pixabay) Zenith Energy Ltd. (“Zenith” or the “Company”) (LSE: ZEN; OSE: ZENA-ME), the listed international oil & gas production company focused on pursuing African development opportunities, is pleased to announce that it has made payment for a total of US$250,000 to Kuwait Foreign Petroleum Exploration Company K.S.C.C (“KUFPEC”), a subsidiary of the State of Kuwait’s national oil company, in relation to the acquisition of a 22.5% working interest in the North Kairouan permit and the Sidi El Kilani Concession (the ” Tunisian Acquisition “), which contains the Sidi El Kilani oilfield (“SLK”).As publicly announced on April 20, 2020, the total consideration payable by Zenith in relation to the Tunisian Acquisition is US$500,000 (“Consideration”).Under the terms of the conditional sale and purchase agreement (“SPA”), first announced to the market on April 20, 2020, signed between Zenith Energy Netherlands B.V. (“Zenith Netherlands”), a recently incorporated fully owned subsidiary of the Company, and KUFPEC (Tunisia) Limited (“Seller”), a 100% subsidiary of KUFPEC, KUFPEC’s entitlement of oil produced from SLK since the date of signing of the SPA will belong to Zenith Netherlands.It is expected that the production revenue generated since the date of signing of the SPA will be sufficient to fully satisfy the second and final Consideration payment to be made by the Company to the Seller for the Tunisian Acquisition by October 2020. Zenith does not therefore expect to raise additional capital to fund the Tunisian Acquisition.Completion of the Tunisian Acquisition remains conditional on approval being granted by the Comité Consultatif des Hydrocarbures of the Republic of Tunisia in respect of the transfer of the Seller’s right, title and interest in and under the Tunisian Acquisition to Zenith Netherlands.Zenith can confirm that it has initiated the necessary formalities in relation to the aforementioned approval process, and that a decision is expected in due course.Andrea Cattaneo, Chief Executive Officer, commented:“We are delighted with the favourable terms Zenith has secured in relation to the Tunisian Acquisition and we look forward with enthusiasm to beginning activities at SLK in partnership with CNPC and the Tunisian state oil company, Entreprise Tunisienne d’Activités Pétrolières (ETAP).The Company is also actively exploring additional onshore oil production opportunities in the Republic of Tunisia: a safe, democratic jurisdiction with a long-established history of successful oil and gas production activities for independent companies such as Zenith.As is clear, we are systematically executing our development strategy in Africa across a number of opportunities by diligently deploying our financial resources to maximise the enrichment of our portfolio at a time of great opportunity.” Source: Company Press Releaselast_img read more

College choice affects graduate earnings

first_imgData exclusively obtained by Cherwell indicates some shocking trends in salary levels among recently graduated Oxford students. Figures show that within six months of graduating, students from certain colleges earn significantly more than those at others.Provisional survey data of the statistics from the Destination of Leavers from Higher Education census show that at Keble, the average salary six months after graduation was £36,100. The figure at Wadham was almost half of this, at £20,700.President of Wadham Student Union President Jacob Haddad speculated that this was perhaps because Wadham graduates opted for lower paid careers, saying, “Many students at Wadham see themselves pursuing careers in the public sector, the third sector, or the arts.“While salary level is an important measure of success, many students here would argue that it is no more important than job satisfaction and having a socially beneficial career. Sebastian Leape, a first year PPE student at Keble said that he was surprised by the College’s high average, but added, “Although Keble is not as academic as other colleges, the class group is sociable and confident.”The data also showed significant gender imbalances, with female graduates earning less than their male counterparts.At LMH, for instance, the average salary for male undergraduate leavers was £38,100 while the female average was just £21,500.Accounting for the differences, Jonathan Black, Director of the Careers Service, said it may be because fewer women choose to go into the City, and opt instead for jobs in health care or teaching.He added, “The question for me is why women don’t feel they want to apply to the City – when we studied this with about 600 students a year or two ago we learned that women students felt there was significant prejudice in the City (and elsewhere) that manifested particularly in promotion prospects.”Where the information was provided, the statistics also revealed the occupations which recent Oxford students have entered.At least 362 go into secondary education, while 38 of the respondents entered the clergy, and 20 becoming authors or writers.The independent education charity Teach First told Cherwell that almost one in ten current Oxbridge finalists had applied to join their 2011 intakeIn total, 84 Oxford graduates will be joining the scheme this year which makes up just over a tenth of the scheme’s total intake.Liz Brewer, a Senior Officer in their Graduate Recruitment Department, said the company targeted all universities but had a “high presence” in Oxford and held many events with colleges, faculties and university societies throughout the year.She added that they had already had “a lot of interest” from Oxford students for their 2012 intake despite only opening for applications a few weeks ago.The statistics show that 45% of 2010 leavers took up employment while 37% opted for further study and a further 5% were combining work and study.The 2010 unemployment figure for those finishing undergraduate courses was 7%.Commenting on this figure, Jonathan Black said the figure had changed little over recent years and added, “Those who had been unsuccessful at interview, and had received feedback, found it was predominantly about lack of specific experience that let them down.”However, the postgraduate unemployment figure had gone up by 4 percentage points since 2008 which Black described as “a worrying rise”.In light of the introduction of the £9,000 annual fee, the statistics showed the number of students earning below the £21,000 repayment threshold.If the current levels earning below this amount were maintained, 50% of Humanities students would pay nothing back on graduation in 2015 although the figure was only 25% for those in MPLS and social science courses.Rafael Palluch, a third-year Economics and Management student said he already had a job offer in a financial company after completing an internship at the firm.He said he had faced few difficulties in the process, commenting, “If you only plan ahead moving on is very easy.”Commenting on the reliability of the survey, Jonathan Black said they were only able to reach 80% of UK-domiciled leavers as well as 65% of EU-domiciled and 35% of international leavers but admitted the data did have limitations and was “directionally sound, not statistically significant.”He was positive about the graduate employment situation in Oxford, saying that the number of permanent vacancies posted on the Oxford vacancy situation had risen by 45% in the first 5 months of 2011.Black said he believed that Oxford graduates were still at an advantage when it came to finding employment, adding, “I don’t believe that other universities will have seen such a large rise in graduate employment prospects – nationally we hear of 10%-15% rises – we believe that we are reaching new employers who traditionally have not advertised at Oxford or considered hiring an Oxford graduate.”Commenting on the employment situation within the context of the fees rise, David Barclay, outgoing OUSU President, said there would be an “increasing focus for students on how Oxford prepares them for the world of work”He added, “Whilst it would clearly be wrong for Oxford to turn into a production line for the economy, the University does have a responsibility to invest in student development in a holistic sense.”“That means better support for clubs and societies, more training for Common Room officers, and proper funding for organisations.”The full data set containing the survey results is due to be officially released by the Careers Service within the next fortnight.last_img read more