Only propagandists believe settled science

first_imgOn Sept. 15, David Gillikin, Ph.D., suggested that we keep politics out of climate science, since the science is clear and effectively all scientists agree and that the science is settled.Really? Anyone with any common sense knows that science is never settled. Einstein proved that in 1905 with his Theory of Relativity, which upended a 200-year-old Theory of Mechanics created by Isaac Newton.I’m not a global warming believer or a global warming denier. However, I do believe that those scientists who pretend to know what this will cause in 20, 30 or 50 years are white-coated propagandists. Scientists have a very difficult time predicting weather, let alone climate. Witness the recent computer model predictions of the paths of Harvey, Irma and Maria. These computer models could not predict a week in advance, let alone decades. More from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsAlbany County warns of COVID increaseEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the census There is nothing more anti-scientific than the very idea that science is settled, static and impervious to challenge.If climate science is settled, why do its predictions keep changing? Why does a great physicist like Freeman Dyson say: “The models solve the equations of fluid dynamics, and they do a very good job of describing the fluid motions of the atmosphere and the oceans.“They do a very poor job of describing the clouds, the dust, the chemistry and the biology of fields and farms and forests. They do not begin to describe the real world we live in …” and, “What has happened in the past 10 years is that the discrepancies between what’s observed and what’s predicted have become much stronger. It’s clear now the models are wrong, but it wasn’t so clear 10 years ago.”Climate-change proponents have made their cause a matter of faith. For a geologist who supposedly is the brave carrier of the scientific ethic, there’s more than a tinge of religion in his tirade.Bob LindingerGuilderlandcenter_img Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more

Healthy rises amid slip

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Environmental Protection and the Human Rights Act

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Prime office rents falling across Europe

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Fruits of the boom

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Driven out

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Shaftesbury predicts West End revival

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COVID-19: Jakarta suspends mass gathering, filming permits as part of containment measures

first_imgThe Jakarta city administration has temporarily suspended the issuance of permits for mass gatherings, including for film shooting purposes, as part of its COVID-19 containment efforts.The administration through its One-Stop Integrated Services Agency (BPTSP) will stop issuing permits indefinitely following a 2020 instruction issued by Governor Anies Baswedan on March 3, a day after Indonesia reported its first confirmed COVID-19 cases.”We will temporarily suspend permit and non-permit services, both manually and digitally, for events that can potentially gather large crowds,” agency head Benni Agus Chandra said, as quoted on the administration’s official website. The suspension includes permits to use public parks, green spaces and cemeteries for filming purposes, bazaars, competitions, camps, makeshift constructions and sports and youth events.Indonesia reported on Monday that two of its citizens had tested positive for COVID-19, both of whom are currently being treated at the Sulianti Saroso Infectious Diseases Hospital in Jakarta.Following the news, a number of public events set to be held in Jakarta have either been canceled or postponed.Governor Anies, however, has refused to comment on whether the Jakarta administration would cancel the Formula E race, which is slated to be held for the first time in June. (ars)Topics :last_img read more

Ministry mulls providing companies soft loans to pay Idul Fitri bonus

first_imgThe COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted business activity as consumers stay at home to curb the virus spread, resulting in weakening demand. Companies across the country, mainly those operating in the hospitality sector, have furloughed or laid-off employees. Read also: COVID-19: Govt reminds businesses that Idul Fitri bonuses are ‘mandatory’Indonesia usually sees household spending, which accounts for more than half of economic activity, peak during Ramadan and Idul Fitri, as companies and the government pay bonuses to employees and civil servants, respectively.While some companies have struck a deal with their workers or unions to pay their THR in installments, Agus said companies that could not come to an agreement with their workers could apply for the loans. The Industry Ministry is discussing the possibility of providing businesses with soft loans to enable them to pay Idul Fitri holiday bonuses (THR) as the economic downturn is forcing companies to withhold or cut the bonus payment.The ministry is in discussion with the central bank and the Financial Services Authority (OJK) over the matter, Minister Agus Gumiwang Kartasasmita told journalists during an online press briefing on Tuesday.“We are preparing a soft loan scheme for hard-hit industries so they can pay THR to their employees in full,” Agus said. “During a dialogue with industrial company associations, the companies said they were willing to pay their workers’ THR even though they had to take loans out from banks,” he said.Previously, Coordinating Economic Minister Airlangga Hartarto reminded businesses that they were obligated pay THR, despite the economic pressures brought about by the pandemic.Read also: Not all companies unable to pay Idul Fitri bonuses, labor union says as businesses ask for leeway“President Joko ‘Jokowi’ Widodo has discussed the business sector’s readiness to pay THR and [we remind] the private sector that paying THR is mandatory,” Airlangga said during a virtual press briefing on April 2.Meanwhile, the Indonesian Employers Association submitted on April 6 a proposal to the Office of Coordinating Economic Minister and the Workers Social Security Agency, asking to postpone the payment of THR for a year due to the COVID-19 crisis.Topics :last_img read more

Zoom earnings soar as video meets become pandemic norm

first_img“The COVID-19 crisis has driven higher demand for distributed, face-to-face interactions and collaboration using Zoom,” founder and chief executive Eric Yuan said in a release.The quarter ended with Zoom having approximately 265,400 paying customers with at least 10 employees each – an increase of 354 percent from the first quarter in 2019, according to the company based in the Silicon Valley city of San Jose.Zoom shares that ended the formal trading day up slightly gave back the gain in after-market trades, apparently due to concerns that its popularity will decline when restrictions on movements ease and people can get back to seeing one another in person.Zoom told analysts that about half the growth in paid use was customers paying month-to-month, and those types of subscribers are more likely to leave than those who commit to annual memberships. “It’s a reminder that Zoom is seeing an unusual spike during what we hope will be a relatively short term event,” independent tech analyst Rob Enderle said.”Once you don’t have to socially distance as aggressively anymore, a lot of folks are going to want to go back to meeting in person.”It is too soon to tell if monthly customers are abandoning Zoom in places where pandemic shelter-in-place rules are being eased because “even there people are taking their time to go back to work,” according to chief financial officer Kelly Steckelberg.‘Hard lesson’The earnings come with Zoom under pressure to deal with security and privacy as the platform faces scrutiny from rising usage.It has taken heat over uninvited cyber guests disrupting online meetings with a tactic called “zoombombing.” Zoom was originally built for businesses with dedicated IT teams to handle implementing security features, but first-time users flocked to the service to work or socialize from home due to the pandemic.”As CEO, I should have done a better job,” Yuan said on an earnings video call with analysts.”We should have played the role of IT for first-time users. We learned a hard lesson; this was a mistake I made.”As a result the company has poured resources into privacy and security.Zoom is also working on encrypting video meetings end-to-end, saying the feature will be made available only to its business customers and not at the free version of the service.Zoom recently launched a philanthropic foundation with initial grants to San Jose Digital Inclusion Fund, Destination Home, the CDC Foundation, the World Health Organization and the CDE Foundation.Topics : Zoom on Tuesday reported that its earnings soared as its video-meeting service became a popular way to work or socialize while hunkered down due to the coronavirus pandemic.Zoom said it made a profit of US$27 million on revenue that leapt 169 percent to slightly more than $328 million in the fiscal quarter that ended April 30.In the same quarter a year earlier, Zoom reported zero dollars per share in net income for stockholders.last_img read more